Pubcon Vegas 2015 – Google My Business Optimization by Brian Combs

The session in which I presented during Pubcon Vegas 2015 was “Local Search & Reviews.” My co-presenter was Brian Combs who gave an excellent presentation on local search optimization. Here are the notes I took …

The session in which I presented during Pubcon Vegas 2015 was “Local Search & Reviews.” My co-presenter was Brian Combs who gave an excellent presentation on local search optimization. Here are the notes I took …

  • Things are changing every day. Keep in mind that things are changing and that you have to keep on top of changes
  • Make sure your Name, Address, Phone (NAP) information are correct and consistent across the board
  • Don’t use tracking phone numbers, they can cause issues with Google matching information in different data sources
  • Google My Business
    • If the location doesn’t exist, add it
    • Verify the data for accuracy
    • Consider creating a brand new Google account just for this so you don’t get your personal information mixed up with business
  • Make sure to optimize your web pages well
    • NAP info on each page
    • Contact info
    • Include a Google Map showing how to get to your location
    • Semantic Markup – Schema or hCard
  • PlaceRank – works much like PageRank
    • References
    • Reviews
    • Other data from around the web page into this
  • Reviews are very important to local search
    • Impact conversions
    • Can also be useful for keywords
  • Localized content on your own site is also very important
    • Blog about your community
    • Reviews of other local businesses
    • Local resource directory (not link exchange – related or complimentary businesses and groups)
  • Citations are important
    • Business listings on other services
      • Yelp
      • Yahoo Local
      • Etc.
    • UBL.org
    • Moz.com/local/
    • WhiteSpark.ca
  • Get the entire team involved
  • Always think local!

Brian’s advice was very good overall. Local search optimization is rather a specialty unto itself and it pays to understand how it works and do it properly.

Pubcon Vegas 2015 – The Ultimate Actionable Signals by Adam Proehl

At Pubcon Vegas 2015, Adam Proehl gave a great presentation about important things to measure in social marketing campaigns; ones that are often ignored. Here are some notes I took during his presentation in the Social Media Data & Analytics session …

Adam Proehl giving a presentation during Pubcon Vegas 2015At Pubcon Vegas 2015, Adam Proehl gave a great presentation about important things to measure in social marketing campaigns; ones that are often ignored. Here are some notes I took during his presentation in the Social Media Data & Analytics session …

  • 47% of execs look at increase in “followers” “likes” “fans” etc. according to eMarketer data from 2014
  • 83% of Brand marketers look at shares
  • What’s missing in a lot of stats is analysis – look beyond emotional sparks and get to the “why”
  • It’s better to learn that you’re loved (or that you suck) and how to get more love (or suck less)
  • Budget and resources are a challenge – most analysts are a team of one with limited money and resources
  • How to get more with what you already have
    • Ratio of likes/talking about – likes divided by mentions
    • Look for the “whys” – you don’t have to buy tools, the social services have free tools to help you with this
    • Know your audience – encourage positive engagement. #rue21 is a great example of encouraging selfie shares
    • Great Clips is doing a “go to the front of the line” campaign if someone shares a selfie when in the store
    • Look for response rate, commentary and amplification
    • Don’t just look at summary roll ups – dig into the data and analyze
    • “Reach” is often flawed – it’s not actionable
    • It appears that Twitter is going to start hiding share counts on their service. This can cause issues with those who use it
    • Use http://pinterest.com/source/linktoyourwebsite.com to see what’s shared there
    • Regarding social as a ranking signal in search: If no one cares about your stuff, then search engines won’t, either

I think that last comment is very much on point. Google and Bing look to provide links to information that people find useful and interesting. If your content is neither of those, then the search engines will reflect people who ignore it.

Pubcon Vegas 2015 – What Does My Data Mean by Mana Ionescu

During the Social Media Data & Analytics session at Pubcon Vegas 2015, Mana Ionescu shared some great information about measuring the impact of social media. Here are some of the notes I took during her presentation …

Mana Ionescu during a session on social media measurement at Pubcon Vegas 2015.During the Social Media Data & Analytics session at Pubcon Vegas 2015, Mana Ionescu shared some great information about measuring the impact of social media. Here are some of the notes I took during her presentation …

  • You can only measure what you can control
  • You must have the tools
  • You need reference points
    • For example you need to know the average value of a visitor on your website.
    • Also make sure you use the same measurements on each channel
  • Translate ROI goals
    • Marketing is a cost – even online
      • ROI can’t be measured if you don’t know where the investment went
      • Annotate Google Analytics like crazy – helps remind you what happened when (2 references to this)
    • Find the strategy and tactics that give you the lowest cost per acquisition
  • Make sure you are interpreting your data correctly
  • Check data by asking:
    • “what does it mean”
    • or “does it mean”
    • and “Does it matter”
  • Follow the “waterfall”
    • Awareness
    • Interest
    • Action
  • If you know what you’re measuring and what’s going on, you can do some backwards planning to align your goals with tactics
  • It’s all about the numbers!
    • Value
    • Historic data

Mana brought up something very important, and it’s something that we online marketers often neglect: Know how to tie your efforts back to revenue. The more you can understand the revenue of the actions you take and how to properly measure it, the more successful you will be.

Pubcon Vegas 2015 – Social Analytics Straight From The Backyard by Alan K’necht

In the Social Media & Analytics session during Pubcon Vegas 2015, Alan K’necht shared some ideas on social measurement using some gardening analogies. Here are the notes I took during his talk …

Alan K'necht during the Social Media & Analtyics session at Pubcon Vegas 2015In the Social Media & Analytics session during Pubcon Vegas 2015, Alan K’necht shared some ideas on social measurement using some gardening analogies. Here are the notes I took during his talk …

Annotations in analytics are very important

  • Social is more than just monetary ROI – connections are important, too
  • Gardening analogy: It’s not about how many seeds you plant or how many blooms you get, it’s how many bees and butterflies you attract (think sharing)
  • Make it easy to convert – social links to a website don’t mean much unless you make it easy to convert.
  • Look where your audience is on social
    • Don’t go someplace where people who are interested in what you offer don’t hang out
    • Lean how the platforms you use operate – include community expectations
    • Be effective!
  • Good planning can help keep time needs to a minimum
  • Don’t just trust click counts from social tools, double-check website analytics
  • Calculate labor costs in your ROI – can be very valuable to see what the true value is
  • Don’t forget to see who’s coming in from shares … try to use different short links to better calculate this
  • Use your CRM system to help track the data
  • Measure EVERYTHING

It’s that last point that is key. You don’t know what’s going on if you don’t measure different aspects of your social efforts and how they are affecting your other online channels. Figure out what “winning” is and measure those things that will help you determine whether you are winning … or losing.

Pubcon Vegas 2015 – How To Perfect Your Marketing by Guy Kawasaki

Pubcon Vegas 2015 kicked off with a great keynote by Guy Kawasaki, Chief Evangelist of Canva. His address was titled “How To Perfect Your Marketing,” which had a good many hints at building your personal brand online as well as helping your business – whatever that may be. Here are some notes I jotted down …

Pubcon Vegas 2015 kicked off with a great keynote by Guy Kawasaki, Chief Evangelist of Canva. His address was titled “How To Perfect Your Marketing,” which had a good many hints at building your personal brand online as well as helping your business – whatever that may be. Here are some notes I jotted down:

Top 10 tips for marketing:

  1. Perfect your perspective
    1. Compare eHarmony to Tinder
    2. in-depth versus “gut feeling” from just a photo
  2. Perfect your avatar – likeable, trustworthy and competent.
    1. Focus on just your face – not a lot of other stuff.
    2. Make the profile image the same across all your web spaces
  3. Perfect your cover photo
    1. It should have a “narrative” that shows who you are and what you’re about.
    2. Optimize the size for the service/platform – make sure it works well with aspect ratio and size
    3. Darker colors shows seriousness
    4. Don’t keep the default image!
    5. “Every profile is your professional profile” [this one is very important!]
      1. Think about people searching on your name
      2. How you portray yourself is how they are going to think about you
  4. Perfect your business cards
    1. Use big fonts – 10 point minimum
    2. Ensure scan-ability – if it can’t be scanned and interpreted via OCR (like in Evernote) and stored it’s useless
    3. Include your cell phone number
    4. Corollary – do the same thing in your email signatures. Include your email so it’s easier to find it in case it gets stripped out in multiple forwards
    5. Consider using a service like Evercontact – scans your Gmail and pulls email signatures and collate the data in the contacts and update them
  5. Optimize your slide decks
    1. 10 slides
    2. 20 minutes
    3. 30 point font
    4. 16×9 format (HD)
    5. Black background (can hide 4×3 format when 16×9 is used)
    6. If you’re pitching for an investment – get to a demo ASAP
  6. Perfect your pictures
    1. Shoot horizontally – it’s a horizontal world
    2. Crop tight – faces tell a better story
    3. Light from the front – backlit pictures are terrible
    4. “Crop crap constantly”
    5. Optimize dimensions – just like cover photos – each social media service has their own optimal standards
  7. Perfect your posts
  8. Social media is marketing
    1. Embrace the NPR model
      1. People tolerate the pledge drive because they give out great content.
      2. Have this perspective – provide value so that you earn the right to use your social media for marketing
      3. Pass the reshare test
      4. Be careful of what you share – if what you share sucks, then you suck
      5. Graphics are very important – add them.
        1. Graphics increase engagement tremendously.
        2. Twitter now allows 4 pics per tweet.
      6. Upload video natively to Facebook – makes the video much more prominent
    2. Perfect your frequency
      1. Guy tweets about 85 times per day, 365 days a week
      2. He shares the same content 3 times, 8 hours apart
      3. Reshares go up as the content is shared more often
      4. Experiment and see how it works for you
      5. You will make some people angry – but that number will be very small
  9. Perfect your pin-ability
    1. People look for all sorts of information on Pinterest
    2. Optimize your pages so pinning is easy for your users
    3. Pin your content and test how it will work with your website users
  10. Perfect your methods
    1. Don’t rely on someone else to tell you what to do
    2. Try things and test for yourself
    3. Keep experimenting!

I think the most important quote in this whole session as “Every profile is a business profile.” I’ve talked to many people who check social media profiles in the course of making hiring decisions. To a person they’ve all mentioned that they have deliberately not hired someone because of the things those candidates posted on their social media profiles.