Jay Baer – Keynote – Pubcon Vegas 2014

I’ve been listening and reading stuff by Jay Baer for quite a while. When he appeared on Warren Whitlock’s podcast a couple weeks ago talking about “Youtility,” it was quite intriguing. I’m glad I got to hear more about this concept during Jay’s keynote address on Thursday during Pubcon Vegas 2014. Here are the notes I took …

I’ve been listening and reading stuff by Jay Baer for quite a while. When he appeared on Warren Whitlock‘s podcast a couple weeks ago talking about “Youtility,” it was quite intriguing. I’m glad I got to hear more about this concept during Jay’s keynote address on Thursday during Pubcon Vegas 2014. Here are the notes I took:

Youtility – Why Smart Marketing is About Help not Hype

  • Being a great marketer is harder than ever
  • 3 enormous obstacles to great marketing
    • Reach is fragmented
      • TV shows went from over 30% of viewership in 1979 to less than 7% in 2014
      • People spend more time looking at “computer” screens than TV screens. This is both good and bad news.
      • People are doing their own things, so it’s harder than ever to get their attention
    • Marketing and customer service has collided
      • Customers are passive-aggressive with their complaints.
      • Reviews and complaints are now marketing – (think about the Zero Moment of Truth)
      • Customer service is now a spectator sport
    • Competition for attention is tougher
      • There’s no such thing as keeping “professional” and “personal” lives separate online any more
      • Your competition is everything.
      • It’s not about if you’re better at marketing than your competitor, your marketing competition is the rest of the world
      • Think about your Facebook feed – posts from friends and family intermixed with posts by companies.
    • What do marketers do?
      • Stop being amazing and start being useful
      • The difference between helping and selling is just 2 letters
        • You can sell something and make a customer for today
        • Or, you can help someone and make them a customer for life
        • Stop thinking “right now” and start thinking long term
      • A great example of this is @HiltonSuggests – people strategically eavesdrop and helping people randomly. They’re helping people even if they are not Hilton guests – using staff time and staff resources.
      • Think about helping without getting an immediate reward/return
    • Youtility is marketing so useful, people would pay for it.
      • Make marketing something people cherish instead of marketing something people tolerate
      • Example: TweetPee – an app in test marketing that will send a tweet when it’s time to change baby’s diaper.
      • People love “youtility” so search engines love “youtility”
      • “Youtility” requires great courage
        • Example of this is the Clorox myStainApp.
          • Tells you the answer to getting stains out of your clothes, and that answer isn’t always Clorox
          • The idea is to make this something people will keep on their phone – so it needed to be more than a complicated brochure or a coupon dispenser
        • Lowes has their “Fix in Six” content marketing series that helps people solve everyday problems quickly.
      • 3 Ways to Create Youtility
        • Self-service information
          • In 2010 the average consumer needed 5.3 sources of information before making a purchase. In 2011, it was up to 10.4.
          • As a consumer, if you make a bad decision today, you’re just lazy
          • There is just too much information available these days at your fingertips
          • “I don’t know” is no longer an acceptable answer – just google it.
          • Share your expertise online (Be That Expert)
          • Relationships are created with information first, people second
          • The better you teach, the more you’ll sell
        • Transparency and Humanity
        • Real time relevancy
          • You’re much better off being massively useful in limited situations rather than a little useful a lot
          • Example: Scrabble wifi hotspots
          • It doesn’t have to be high-budget. Use IFTTT to send out useful information on Twitter like the Corchoran Group in NYC
        • Great Youtility can transcend the transaction
        • How to Create Youtility
          • Focus on what people REALLY need
          • We are surrounded by data, but staved for insights
          • Content is fire, social media is gasoline – use social media to attract attention to your content, not your brand
        • Youtility is a process, not a project!
          • This is not magic – it takes hard work
          • Inspiration doesn’t respond to meeting requests
          • You can’t schedule greatness
          • Example: RunPee – tells you when it’s safe to run out to the restroom during lulls in movies

Check out Jay’s Book Youtility: Why Smart Marketing Is About Help Not Hype (Amazon Affiliate link). I’ve got it on my reading list.

When I got home from Pubcon, I listened to the EntreLeadership podcast that I downloaded over the week. Wouldn’t you know it, Jay Baer just happened to give a great summary of his book in an interview with host, Ken Coleman. Check it out.

Dr. Robert Cialdini – Kickoff Keynote – Pubcon NOLA 2014

Dr. Robert Cialdini kicked off Pubcon NOLA 2014 with a great presentation entitled “The Power of Persuasion Under Conditions of Uncertainty” which was an updated version of the opening kickoff keynote he gave at Pubcon Vegas 2014. Here are some notes I took during his talk …

Dr. Robert Cialdini addresses the audience during his Pubcon NOLA kickoff keynoteDr. Robert Cialdini kicked off Pubcon NOLA 2014 with a great presentation entitled “The Power of Persuasion Under Conditions of Uncertainty,” which was an updated version of the opening kickoff keynote he gave at Pubcon Vegas 2014. Here are some notes I took during his talk:

  • People freeze in uncertainty waiting for things to change before they move forward
  • Influencing them is important in this situation
  • While there are no hard, fast rules for persuasion, you can influence how others perceive you
  • 3 Consequences Of Decisional Uncertainty
    • Freezing – reluctance to act until the uncertainty is reduced before they will move forward
    • Loss Aversion – A tendency to prefer choices designed to prevent losses instead of those designed to obtain gains
    • Heuristic Choices – When choices are made, they are based on a single relevant factor rather than on the total set of relevant factors
  • “New” implies uncertainty – new, untested, untried
    • Don’t use “New” as a headline
    • Only around 5% of consumers are early adopters
  • 6 Universal Principles of Social Influence:
    • Reciprocation
      • In every human culture there is a rule – I am obligated to give back to you behavior that you showed me (return invites to parties, favor for favor, etc.) – This rule is taught to everyone from childhood
      • People say “yes” to those whom they “owe” something
      • We can get something by giving it first
      • People listen differently if you give first
      • Invest in those whom you want to invest in you
      • Give something personalized to the other person’s circumstances. That will really get their attention. Personalization to the target audience is very beneficial
      • Don’t expect value back if you don’t give it first
      • This is activated by going first
    • Liking
      • No surprise: people prefer to say “yes” to those they like
      • When pride gets in the way, concessions are not made and negotiations break down
      • Getting to know the other person and sharing information about yourself helps bridge barriers and can personalize talks
      • People like those who are like them. Finding commonalities can help in great ways
      • Learn about the other’s background, interests, hobbies, etc. to build rapport – Look on social media for clues of things you have in common with them
      • It also pays to be proactive about sharing information about yourself. Put some personal information in “About Us” pages. Personal information helps to build rapport from the connections they see in common interests
    • Commitment/Consistency
      • People want to be consistent in what they have committed themselves to in public
      • People don’t want to be seen as inconsistent
      • Before you ask people to take a step in a direction that’s big, ask them to take a smaller step. This builds the case for consistency
      • If you want to get people to follow through in a significant way, we need to get them to write it down. “People live up to what they write down.”
      • Don’t praise “progress” because progress often causes people to “let off the gas.” Congratulate on “commitment” to goals instead of “steps towards” or “progress” – different frame of reference. Progress is behind us, commitment is in front.
    • Scarcity
      • People want more of what they can have less of
      • “If I can’t have it, I want it”
      • Think iPhone or iPads on launch day or Black Friday specials
      • Scarcity is about loss
      • The tendency to avoid loss predominates decisional uncertainty
      • Talk about how much or what a person will lose if they don’t go with your product or service rather than what they will gain
      • You have the right to honestly tell what potential customers will forego or lose if they don’t go with you
      • Don’t do scare tactics … you don’t need to
      • Bose Wave Music System
        • Used “New” for headlines in their ads – only early adopters bought (“New” communicates uncertainty)
        • Changed “New” to “Hear what you’ve been missing” and the ad brought a 45% jump in sales
        • Scarcity of information is also important to remember.
          • “Exclusive” information tends to be more persuasive.
          • “I just got this today …”
          • It doesn’t have to be proprietary or “secret” – it can be something you just happened to hear first
          • The merits of the case and the information need to be true – no being dishonest is allowed
    • Authority
      • If experts say it, it must be true
      • One way you can reduce uncertainty is to honestly tell what authorities on the topic are saying
      • Credibility
        • Knowledge
          • Before you try to be influential, be honest about your background, experience and other credentials in the area you are trying to be influential
          • But – don’t do it yourself. Have another expert introduce you. Otherwise you come across as self-promotional. This is where introductions from a mutual 3rd party can be important
          • A letter of introduction before the first meeting can be used in place of a 3rd party introduction when the introduction isn’t possible
          • Trustworthiness
            • Letting others know you are being truthful in what you are telling them
            • This can be built up over time – a perception of you as a trustworthy source grows as you are honest and a straight-shooter with them
            • When establishing trustworthiness on a first meeting, lead with a potential weakness in your case before hitting them with the most compelling information. This is counterintuitive, but it helps build credibility early in an engagement
            • You don’t need to change the words of your argument, just the sequence in which they are presented
          • People want to know what the experts are saying about a topic – even if that’s you
    • Consensus
      • What are the people around me, or like me (peers) doing in this situation
      • Think about how many people check product reviews before buying – this is persuasion by consensus
      • Consider marking items that are “most popular” – even with no other changes sales will likely go up
      • This is entirely honest, and hardly ever employed
      • Amazon uses this very successfully
      • We follow the lead of
        • Many others
        • Similar others
      • Consensus is at the core of social media
      • Potential buyers are now able to access what “many others” and “similar others” are saying
      • Moms use social media like this 243% more than other groups

Leadership Unplugged – A Google Hangout Event

Last week at the Pubcon Austin Regional, I had an opportunity chat with Rebecca Murtagh, author of Million Dollar Websites, before the final keynote. Rebecca has been hosting Google Hangouts after several recent Pubcon events, and I asked if she was going to do that again. In our pursuing conversation, she asked if I’d like share some of the ideas about leadership I talked about during the “In-House SEO” session earlier in the day. I thought that was a great idea, so we will be having a Google Hangout called “Leadership – Unplugged: What Every Leader Should Know” on Thursday, February 13, 2014, 2pm to 3pm Central …

Last week at the Pubcon Austin Regional, I had an opportunity chat with Rebecca Murtagh, author of Million Dollar Websites, before the final keynote. Rebecca has been hosting Google Hangouts after several recent Pubcon events, and I asked if she was going to do that again.

In our pursuing conversation, she asked if I’d like share some of the ideas about leadership I talked about during my “Elmer’s Leadership Lesson 2.8” presentation I did in the “In-House SEO” session earlier in the day. I thought that was a great idea … so we will be having a Google Hangout called “Leadership – Unplugged: What Every Leader Should Know” on Thursday, February 13, 2014, 2pm to 3pm Central.

Leadership Unlugged Google Event

This is listed as a private event. When you click the link above, please click the “Request Invitation” button. Of course, you’ll need a Google account to join in. Accounts are free … just sign up for one.

I am always pleasantly surprised how well my leadership talks are received at Pubcon events. Certainly, the main reason why people attend Pubcon and other industry events is to help hone their technical skills. While this is certainly a critical aspect of working in a technical field, those of us who lead people are sometimes not as dedicated to honing our non-technical, people-related skills. That’s not to say we are neglectful or bad – not at all. It’s just that we sometimes are so heads-down and focused on work, that we don’t think about those other skills needed to build a great team. That’s where I come in.

During the hangout, I’ll highlight some points from last week’s presentation, then have some time for Rebecca and I to do some Q&A, then we’ll open up the discussion to anyone for questions, discussion or whatever.

Sign up and join me and Rebecca. I’m sure you’ll learn something you can take back to help you be a better team leader.

Doc Searls Keynote – PubCon Vegas 2012 Day 3

Day 3 of PubCon Vegas 2012 kicked off with a keynote by Doc Searls, one of the coauthors of The Cluetrain Manifesto. He kicked off his talk by reminding us of Mona “The Hammer” Shaw who took matters in her own hands and let her local Comcast office know how much they ticked her off by trashing the office. He has some interesting things to say about consumers (and customers in B2B settings) taking power and control of their destinies. Here are the notes I jotted …

Day 3 of PubCon Vegas 2012 kicked off with a keynote by Doc Searls, one of the coauthors of The Cluetrain Manifesto. He kicked off his talk by reminding us of Mona “The Hammer” Shaw who took matters in her own hands and let her local Comcast office know how much they ticked her off by trashing the office. He has some interesting things to say about consumers (and customers in B2B settings) taking power and control of their destinies. Here are the notes I jotted:

  • Independence and engagement – that’s what customers want
  • With the introduction of the pc, people got the power of computing in their homes and on their desks.
  • The Internet brought low cost international communication. Data exchange gave people the power. It’s a personal movement, not just social.
  • The smartphone made portable when the pc brought. We have independence and ways to engage.
  • At least three beliefs holding business back:
    • Disservice – Google, Facebook, and Twitter are platforms for us. Like traditional media, the advertisers are their real customers, not their users. Try getting service out of Google sometimes.
    • Surveillance – Big data is not way to really know and talk to customers. Check out wsj.com/wtk . Just over 9% of all ads are blocked on average in the US, Canada and European countries.
    • Gimmicks – Loyalty card craze. Trader Joe’s doesn’t do loyalty cards or advertising. The leaders go to ask customers what they like and why they buy what they buy. They connect with customers.
  • When the browser first came out, we thought about it like a car. We used it to go places. Now, it’s more like a shopping cart. It’s not a private space like a car, it’s like a cart in the store.
  • Look at mobile data plans … It’s a confusopoly where they hate their customers and offer them confusing choices so they pay for stuff they don’t use.
    • Ting is a mobile provider in Canada run by customers where you only pay for what you use. If you go over you pay more, if you go under you get a credit towards the next month. Novel and totally different.
  • Markets just aren’t conversations, markets are relationships. Be different!
  • Market are made of three things:
    • Transaction
    • Conversation
    • Relationship
    • We should put relationships first.
  • CRM is the business side, VRM is the customer side.
    • With VRM, the customer drives. VRM is hot in Europe, but not in the US.
    • With VRM customers control the data and how it’s used.
    • VRMs let’s customers set their policies, preferences and terms of service.
    • With VRM you can intentcast to the whole market. “Here’s my money, meet my requirements.”
    • In the end Free customers will prove more valuable to captive customers.
    • Read The Intention Economy (Amazon Affiliate Link)
    • Join customer commons.

PubCon Vegas 2012 – Day 2

Day two of PubCon Vegas 2012 was full of interesting news. Most notably was the announcement by Brett Tabke that webmasterworld.com has been sold to Internet Marketing Ninjas. I won’t give out all the details here, but you can read about the deal on the WebmasterWorld website.

Day two of PubCon Vegas 2012 was full of interesting news. Most notably was the announcement by Brett Tabke that webmasterworld.com has been sold to Internet Marketing Ninjas. I won’t give out all the details here, but you can read about the deal on the WebmasterWorld website.

I spent most of the day bouncing around site review and open mic sessions. My friend Jason Potts did a great job presenting on re-branding online properties when merging with or acquiring another company. The best tip from that session: Make sure you search on all the phone numbers of the company being acquired before they are turned off so you can identify as many of their online properties as you can.

The one session I did attend was Content Strategy, which was moderated by Rhea Drysdale. Here are my notes from that session:

What a Journalist Can Tell Us About Content Marketing
Robert Riggs Principal frontpageTV (@robertriggs)

  • Robert is an old-school media guy who was last with CBS and made the conversion to online after the old media implosion. He is a recipient of the Peabody Award.
  • Now pulling people into your online property instead of pushing info.
  • People love stories that entice, enchant, entertain, educate and evoke emotions.
  • Storytelling and imagery are in our DNA.
  • Even DARPA has done research in narrative styles of writing. Narrative writing is 4x more engaging than other types os stories.
  • Think of Shakespeare’s three-part narrative. He was a master of resonating on an emotional level.
  • Get your readers to identify with a person (hopefully the “good guy”)
  • Ian Lurie of Portent has a great way of describing what journalists do. Give Your Customers a Monster to Slay – Make them part of story, slay the monster and take its stuff.
  • Rob Snell does a great job telling stories on the Gun Dog Supply site.
  • Research shows pictures with animals releases oxtytocin and projects the images of being attractive and trustworthy.
  • Social media contacts also release oxytocin and builds trust. Shoot for 8 “social media hugs” per day.
  • Breaking news will attract a lot of good attention. If you can catch a story before it trends, you’re in a great place.
  • Titles are very important. “Don’t bury the lead” is an old journalism saying.
  • There’s nothing better than a great story, well told.

Content Strategy
Dan Sturdivant, Account Manager at Speakeasy  (@dansturdivant)

  • Content Marketing – Story telling and the sales funnel: The sales funnel isn’t a funnel any more, it’s a constantly revolving circle.
  • Focus on buyers issues and outcomes. It’s not about “me” anymore
  • If your content matches the customer’s need state, you can make a sale much quicker.
  • Content becomes an asset, which will live far beyond the initial posting.
  • Consider this: Red Bull isn’t an energy drink company so much of a content and story company.

Content Strategy
Phillip Thune, CEO Americas, Textbroker International (@textbroker)

  • Prepare your content: Audience, Attitude Attack Plan. This happens even before you put pen to paper or fingers to keys.
  • Who will think your stuff is great? Check demographics, locations and check social signals to make sure youu’re being effective. Keep going after stuff your audience is interested in.
  • Once again: It’s not about you … it’s about getting your audience interested.
  • Don’t lose your company style, though. You need to keep your voice while making content your audience will appreciate.
  • Even Best Buy is a content company. Even though they are selling stuff, the publish a lot of content about the things they sell.
  • Use an editorial calendar to keep your content consistent, plan for timing and resource availability and to brainstorm ideas. [When I talked to people after the session, they all said this was the best tip of the session. It’s very important, but so many neglect to plan out content.]
  • Be flexible in your calendar so you can jump on current, developing events and news.
  • Connect with your audiences interests, including things not directly related business.
  • Consider outsourcing for content ideas instead of getting pre-made content if you run out of ideas.
  • You can also outsource to freelancers, bidding sites and content companies if you need pre-made content.