Pubcon Vegas 2015 – How To Perfect Your Marketing by Guy Kawasaki

Pubcon Vegas 2015 kicked off with a great keynote by Guy Kawasaki, Chief Evangelist of Canva. His address was titled “How To Perfect Your Marketing,” which had a good many hints at building your personal brand online as well as helping your business – whatever that may be. Here are some notes I jotted down …

Pubcon Vegas 2015 kicked off with a great keynote by Guy Kawasaki, Chief Evangelist of Canva. His address was titled “How To Perfect Your Marketing,” which had a good many hints at building your personal brand online as well as helping your business – whatever that may be. Here are some notes I jotted down:

Top 10 tips for marketing:

  1. Perfect your perspective
    1. Compare eHarmony to Tinder
    2. in-depth versus “gut feeling” from just a photo
  2. Perfect your avatar – likeable, trustworthy and competent.
    1. Focus on just your face – not a lot of other stuff.
    2. Make the profile image the same across all your web spaces
  3. Perfect your cover photo
    1. It should have a “narrative” that shows who you are and what you’re about.
    2. Optimize the size for the service/platform – make sure it works well with aspect ratio and size
    3. Darker colors shows seriousness
    4. Don’t keep the default image!
    5. “Every profile is your professional profile” [this one is very important!]
      1. Think about people searching on your name
      2. How you portray yourself is how they are going to think about you
  4. Perfect your business cards
    1. Use big fonts – 10 point minimum
    2. Ensure scan-ability – if it can’t be scanned and interpreted via OCR (like in Evernote) and stored it’s useless
    3. Include your cell phone number
    4. Corollary – do the same thing in your email signatures. Include your email so it’s easier to find it in case it gets stripped out in multiple forwards
    5. Consider using a service like Evercontact – scans your Gmail and pulls email signatures and collate the data in the contacts and update them
  5. Optimize your slide decks
    1. 10 slides
    2. 20 minutes
    3. 30 point font
    4. 16×9 format (HD)
    5. Black background (can hide 4×3 format when 16×9 is used)
    6. If you’re pitching for an investment – get to a demo ASAP
  6. Perfect your pictures
    1. Shoot horizontally – it’s a horizontal world
    2. Crop tight – faces tell a better story
    3. Light from the front – backlit pictures are terrible
    4. “Crop crap constantly”
    5. Optimize dimensions – just like cover photos – each social media service has their own optimal standards
  7. Perfect your posts
  8. Social media is marketing
    1. Embrace the NPR model
      1. People tolerate the pledge drive because they give out great content.
      2. Have this perspective – provide value so that you earn the right to use your social media for marketing
      3. Pass the reshare test
      4. Be careful of what you share – if what you share sucks, then you suck
      5. Graphics are very important – add them.
        1. Graphics increase engagement tremendously.
        2. Twitter now allows 4 pics per tweet.
      6. Upload video natively to Facebook – makes the video much more prominent
    2. Perfect your frequency
      1. Guy tweets about 85 times per day, 365 days a week
      2. He shares the same content 3 times, 8 hours apart
      3. Reshares go up as the content is shared more often
      4. Experiment and see how it works for you
      5. You will make some people angry – but that number will be very small
  9. Perfect your pin-ability
    1. People look for all sorts of information on Pinterest
    2. Optimize your pages so pinning is easy for your users
    3. Pin your content and test how it will work with your website users
  10. Perfect your methods
    1. Don’t rely on someone else to tell you what to do
    2. Try things and test for yourself
    3. Keep experimenting!

I think the most important quote in this whole session as “Every profile is a business profile.” I’ve talked to many people who check social media profiles in the course of making hiring decisions. To a person they’ve all mentioned that they have deliberately not hired someone because of the things those candidates posted on their social media profiles.

The Saturday Summary – 7/25/2015

This past week, there was some interesting online reputation management (ORM) news as well as several stories about Google. Here are the items that caught my eye during the week of July 20-24, 2015 …

This past week, there was some interesting online reputation management (ORM) news as well as several stories about Google. Here are the items that caught my eye during the week of July 20-24, 2015 …

The Saturday Summary

Monday

Recently, Mitsubishi apologized for its role in using American POWs as slave labor during World War II. Tim Bower and Lucy Hooker at the BBC used this as a jumping off point for an article looking at good and bad examples (mostly bad) of corporate apologies. Bottom line: There are ways to apologize without putting yourself into legal hot water. “I’m sorry” can be the two most powerful words in ORM, and can often lead to diffusing what, otherwise, could be a very negative impact on a brand’s online reputation. Check out the full story: Sorry: Is it too hard for ‘macho’ company bosses to say?

Tuesday

For the most part, I don’t believe lawsuits are the way to deal with negative online comments against a brand. Many times, following a well thought out online reputation management strategy can help forestall negative content posted by users. Of course, there are times when legal action is warranted, but normally that would be only in extreme circumstances. This week came news that Herbalife has filed suit against Twitter in order to learn the identity of someone who “… posted defamatory tweets against the weight-loss and nutritional products maker … ” and “… vilified the the company and its management as ‘thieves, pill pushing frauds and bullies.'” It’ll be interesting to see how this turns out. Check out the details on this Reuters story from Yahoo News: Herbalife files petition to seek user information from Twitter

I get lots of questions about the new generic top-level domains (gTLDs). Google does, too, and they shared out how they handle them in search results in this Google Webmaster Central Blog post by John Mueller: Google’s handling of new top level domains. Bottom line: Google treats those gTLDs as they do other TLDs such as .com and .org. I don’t recommend using them for a business’ main website just yet because the public is still stuck in .COM for now. There will come a day when gTLDs will be very commonly used. For now. though, most businesses will find it best to stick with a good .COM.

Wednesday

Many website owners have been pondering switching their sites over to SSL encryption across the board. I think it’s a good idea, but I recommend waiting until a website redesign is being done. Switching over from HTTP to HTTPS takes a lot of planning that’s likely going to be easier when the site is being redone anyway. At any rate, it’s not a good thing to do only as a tactic to rank higher. Google’s Gary Illyes announced this week that SSL is used as a tiebreaker for ranking only when two sites are equal in all other ranking factors. Check out the details shared by Matt Southern on Search Engine Journal: Google: With All Else Equal, HTTPS Gives Sites An Edge

In more ORM news comes an announcement that Microsoft will start honoring requests to remove content from their search results related to revenge porn-type websites. This is a great move that follows on the heels of Google making a similar move several weeks ago. Check out the details by Amy Gesenhues on Search Engine Land: Microsoft’s “Revenge Porn” Reporting Page Helps Victims Get Photos & Videos Out Of Search Results

Thursday

People involved in local search, pay attention to this: Google announced this week that they will start deleting Google+ pages for businesses that have not verified their accounts. It’s important to get the details on this and learn what you have to do to avoid losing this very strong local search signal. Mike Blumenthal shares details on Blumenthals.com: GOOGLE REMOVING ALL NON VERIFIED LOCAL PAGES FROM PLUS?

Google algorithm update watchers will be interested to know that Panda 4.2 launched last weekend. Funny thing is: most of those who generally pick up on these types of things didn’t notice. Check out Google Releases Panda 4.2 & You Didn’t Notice on Search Engine Roundtable by Barry Schwartz.

Friday

In more Google news comes an observation by Mike O’Brien on Search Engine Land that the search giant is testing updates to the Google Knowledge Vault. It looks like answers to questions are starting to take up more real estate at the top of page 1 SERPs. This just reinforces the idea that natural language search is here to stay and that website owners need to think about optimizing their content to answer those questions their customers are likely to ask. Details here: Is Google Testing a Knowledge Vault Update?

The Saturday Summary – 6/6/2015

There was quite a bit of news from the search world last week with several announcements by Google, Uber, Foursquare, Yahoo and some online reputation management (ORM) news. Here are the articles that caught my eye during the week of June 1-5, 2015 …

Today is the 71st Anniversary of D-Day, the beach landings near Normandy, France that marked the beginning of the end of the Nazi occupation of Europe during WWII. The sacrifices on that day were many. Let’s remember that it was those of The Greatest Generation to whom we owe a huge debt of gratitude for the great freedoms and opportunities we enjoy.

The Saturday Summary

There was quite a bit of news from the search world last week with several announcements by Google, Uber, Foursquare, Yahoo and some online reputation management (ORM) news. Here are the articles that caught my eye during the week of June 1-5, 2015 …

Monday

I quit using Foursquare when they split off the check-in part to the Swarm app. I found that the usefulness of the app was diminished. With the announcement that they’ve partnered up with Uber to allow users to request rides to places they find via Foursquare, they may have made themselves more useful again. Emily Alford has the details on Search Engine Watch: Uber Partners With Foursquare to Combine Local Search and Transportation

Tuesday

There were two announcements by Google at SMX Advanced this past week. One that many Google watchers will find interesting is that Google is working towards a continuously running Penguin update. Many who work on Penguin issues will be happy to hear this news from Google’s Gary Illyes. Barry Schwartz shares the details in Search Engine Land: Google: We Are Working On Making The Penguin Update Happen Continuously. In another Search Engine Land piece by Barry we get news that Mr. Illyes also announced that there will likely be a Panda update in the next several weeks. Rather than an update to the algorithm as in the Penguin update, this is a data refresh. Check out: Google Panda Update Coming In Upcoming Weeks

From the Online Reputation Management Desk: Lithium Technologies shared some survey data which tells us that 42% of business leaders have been “shamed” by consumers in social spaces. This is not surprising to me, as I’ve seen some extreme instances of digital shaming by consumers online. As I crawl through the seedy underbelly of the internet, I’ve encountered some pretty terrible lies, unfair accusations and other forms of shaming by consumers. It’s one thing when there is a breakdown in procedures or communication, it’s quite another when someone goes out of their way to unfairly disparage a brand. Check out all the data from the survey shared by Justin Lafferty on SocialTimes: Survey: 42 Percent of Business Leaders Say Consumers Shame Them on Social

Wednesday

Google knows about 30 thousand trillion URLs. That’s a lot of online content. What’s even more important for us to know is that they don’t store all of them in their index. Why? It’s not because they can’t, it’s because they choose not to. It makes sense to me. Why store junk if you don’t have to? Check out the details shared by Barry Schwartz on Search Engine Roundtable: Google: We Know About 30 Thousand Trillion URLs On The Web But…

Thursday

From the “Not Surprising” Department comes news that Google is planning to devalue content hidden behind interstitial pages. I have to admit that I hate having to wait before reading content I click through to view. Although I sometimes share links to that type of content, I try to avoid it because I want you, my valued audience, to have a great experience. Google feels the same way, as expressed by Maile Ohye at SMX Advanced. Check out the details from Jennifer Slegg on TheSEMPost: Google Planning to Devalue Content Behind Interstitials

In another piece of news from Google we learn that those business owners who haven’t logged in to their Google My Business accounts in over 6 months may find their listings removed from the system. This is a great reason to get in there and actively manage your locations every so often. Put it on your calendar so you don’t forget! Check out the details by Matt McGhee on Search Engine Land: Google Says It May Unverify Inactive Local Business Listings

Friday

Something that many website owners are not aware of is that Google makes changes and adjustments to its algorithm on a constant basis. In a recent Google+ Hangout, John Mueller said that the number of updates in a year can number into the thousands. Barry Schwartz shares some of the details on Search Engine Roundtable: Google: We Make Thousands Of Updates To Search Algorithms Each Year

In another Search Engine Roundtable piece, Barry shared news that Yahoo announced this week that they are shuttering Yahoo! Maps at the end of June. With all the heavy investments made by competitors, it seems they were unable to keep up. It’s The End Of The Road For Yahoo Maps

 

The Saturday Summary – 5/9/2015

There was a lot of news around search this past week, as well as about mobile search, Apple’s apparent foray back into search, Yelp and Facebook’s content publishing initiative. Here are the articles that caught my eye during the week May 4-8 2015 …

There was a lot of news around search this past week, as well as about mobile search, Apple’s apparent foray back into search, Yelp and Facebook’s content publishing initiative. Here are the articles that caught my eye during the week May 4-8 2015:

Monday

I remember several years ago, a handful of brands abandoned their websites in favor of a “Facebook First” online presence. At that time I thought it was a terrible idea (still do, too). Apparently those brands changed their minds since they’ve all relaunched websites. This week came some details about Facebook’s new “Instant Articles” platform that would allow content publishers quicker placement of their content. While I can certainly see the upside for Facebook, I really don’t see much of an upside for the publishers. You can read more about it in this WebProNews piece by Chris Crum: Facebook Instant Articles: More Details Emerge.

Tuesday

Wednesday

  • There are some who get really bogged down in the details regarding the length of META title and description tags. That’s not a bad thing, but it’s important to understand the variances in what Google and Bing do with those tags. To that end, Dr. Pete Meyers shares the results of some tests he’s conducted around description lengths on the MOZ Blog: I Can’t Drive 155: Meta Descriptions in 2015.
  • Apple has confirmed they are crawling the web to gather data used in Siri and Spotlight Search results. Applebot 0.1 has been seen out in the wild, and Barry Schwartz tells us the details on Search Engine Land: Apple Confirms Their Web Crawler: Applebot.

Thursday

Indications are that Yelp is looking for a buyer. Greg Sterling on Search Engine Land reports that revenues are down for the leader in the online review space, which is causing some disappointment among investors. Speculations are that Google, Yahoo, Microsoft, Apple and others might be interested in the property. It will be interesting to see how this plays out. WSJ: Yelp Seeking A Potential Buyer.

Friday

Google has been telling us for several months that they are able to render JavaScript in web pages and understand how the pages will render to users. Among those I talk with, the question has been “Oh yeah? How much?” Adam Audette shared the results of some tests he participated in that indicate Google can render JavaScript pages quite well – well enough to understand the content and index it properly. While I’m not ready to tell clients that it’s OK to fall back into the JavaScript camp for menus and such, this is very good information. Check out We Tested How Googlebot Crawls Javascript And Here’s What We Learned on Search Engine Land.

The Saturday Summary – 5/2/2015

Another week goes by and another grouping of news from the online marketing world is ready. Among the stories that caught my attention during the week of April 27-May 1, 2015 were some that covered news about the Google/Twitter agreement, Google search, a new Facebook offering, some online reputation management news and a piece on leadership by Marty Weintraub …

Another week goes by and another grouping of news from the online marketing world is ready. Among the stories that caught my attention during the week of April 27-May 1, 2015 were some that covered news about the Google/Twitter agreement, Google search, a new Facebook offering, some online reputation management news and a piece on leadership by Marty Weintraub …

Monday

Several years ago, I wrote about what I consider leadership genius from Marty Weintraub. The way he runs his business should be an inspiration to business leaders everywhere. This week on the aimClear blog, Marty shared some thoughts on how he has adjusted the main philosophies of aimClear to account for a growing and changing world. Self-assessment and reassessment of business goals and philosophies are important for a leader. It’s key to growth, not only of the business but on a personal level as well. This are certainly worth reading.

Tuesday

  • The Twitter “firehose” will soon be turned on in Google searches. How this will be implemented and shown to Google users is not known just yet. There are also signs that Twitter data is starting to show in spotlight searches in Apple iOS and OSX. Martin Beck has the scoop on Search Engine Land: Twitter’s Full Google Search Integration Is Coming In May
  • Facebook added two new features to its Messenger service that allows for searches within the app as well as easy-to-use video chat. This bulking up of of Messenger is obviously an attempt to hit Google and Microsoft users with competing services to G+ video chat and Skype. Debbie Miller brings us the news on Search Engine Journal: Facebook Introduces “Hello” and Video Calling for Messenger

Wednesday

From the world of online reviews, Wendy Davis on MediaPost tells of a bipartisan bill introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives that is aimed at protecting those who review businesses online. In essence, the bill makes it illegal for businesses to require non-disparagement clauses in contracts with customers as well as those that force customers to transfer copyrights of any online reviews to businesses. You can read more about it here: New Bill Aims To Protect People’s Right To Post Reviews

I completely understand the desire to protect consumers in the area, and I completely disagree with businesses trying to quash honest reviews with these tactics or through lawsuits. I am also very disappointed that this type of legislation is considered necessary. Businesses need to realize that the best way to deal with negative reviews is by providing the best products or services possible and by taking care of things on those occasions when things don’t go as intended. If you have to force people to not write reviews, you have some fundamental problems with your business that need to be corrected or you will eventually go out of business.

Thursday

There was a pretty lively discussion between me and Rockfish colleague Steve Plunkett regarding Expedia’s use of emoji in title tags as a way to increase click-through rates from organic search. We’ve all seen studies that show images do have a positive effect on click throughs, so this seems like a great idea. You can read all about it in this Search Engine Land piece by Barry Schwartz: 🏨 💺 Expedia Adds Emoji To Its Title Tags To Increase Click Through Rates In Google

Friday

On Search Engine Roundtable, Barry Schwartz shared some great information about a Google test going on in Indonesia that “strips down” heavy content to speed up download times when slower mobile connections are happening. Exactly how Google is doing this is open to conjecture. It is an interesting idea, and one that might spread to mobile searches around the world. It’s another great reason to make sure you mobile experience is as good as can be, including with scaled down graphics to help ease data congestion. Read more here: Google May Strip Down Your Web Page On Slower Connections

Bonus

Is the job market in the online world still hot? You bet it is! Check out this piece on Inbound.org by Dharmesh Shah: The Top 14 Skills In The Red Hot Market For Marketing Jobs